Restlessness

By Molly Gibbons

Restlessness is a feeling I have gotten to know pretty well during my time here on earth. It’s the feeling that comes up when I have been in one place for awhile, one that appears during times of frustration or excitement, and one that interrupts my peace of mind if I don’t keep a close eye on it. I used to think that it was my responsibility to get rid of this feeling altogether. I am feeling restless? This must mean that something in my life is wrong. This must mean that I need to make a change–and fast! I would do anything to chase this feeling away. I have lived a pretty colorful life thus far, and that has all been intentionally arranged. Seeking out opportunities, meeting new people, and traveling to different places is how I have managed to “escape” this feeling of restlessness. But, sure enough, no matter what my situation may be, I have recognized that this feeling continues to pop up from time to time.

What does this mean? It means that restlessness is a part of life. The trick is not to run from the restlessness, but to accept the feeling. If I feel this restlessness come on, it doesn’t mean I need to immediately jump ship and switch gears completely. Letting myself know that restlessness is a part of life actually ends up subsiding a lot of this feeling altogether. Running away will simply cause this feeling to eventually follow me to my next venture. It is when one is able to sit in the restlessness and continue with their daily rituals that this restless feeling will pass.

One of the many discoveries I have made so far during my year with VVC is that I am capable of accepting this restlessness. Dedication to personal and group reflection has allowed me to understand that it is, in fact, a part of life and not something that I am alone in dealing with. Although I may not have control over many aspects to do with contributing to restless feelings, I always have control over all the thoughts that enter my head. A way I have learned to sit with this feeling is through being mindful in ways of staying present in the now and practicing meditation. Adopting meditation into my daily routine has created space in my mind and invited ease into my approach on all things I deal with.

Meditation comes in many different forms and is meant to be a practice! Beyond silent and still meditation, one can also practice through walking, music, reading, etc. I am thankful for my relationship with mindful behaviors and encourage others to explore a practice that feels right to them. The key to inviting a new practice into one’s life is to listen to your body. Just like anything else, being mindful about dealing with restlessness is something that will take time and dedication. From personal experience, I can say the time you spend on meditation will better serve you than the time you spend on feeling stuck in the hopeless cycle of “restlessness.”

 

Molly Gibbons is a Margate City, NJ native who brings good vibes to this year’s VVC cohort. She enjoys meditation, burning incense to soothe the soul, and has found that everything tends to fall in place when a person approaches life with an open heart.

Our Community

by Rene Betance

Where would I be without community?

Five of us. One from Nigeria, one from Cleveland, one from Wisconsin, one from New Jersey, and finally one from Mexico. A relatively strange group of people if you’re looking from the outside. We all have a very different way of engaging with the world. The five people that signed up for a year of service with St. Vincent de Paul all took very different paths to get here. Yet we have shared in that fulfillment, struggle, community, and passion that comes with being a VVC.

Given the craziness that has been my life the past year, I believe it is fair that I can’t peacefully say that this has been a great year. I’d be lying to you if living in community wasn’t one of my initial reservations about this year of service. You just never know who you’re going to live with. I was taking a chance with living with four strangers. But I can gladly say that these four friends of mine have helped me to overcome a year of political turmoil and change.

Regardless of where you stood during the election, the political climate in the United States is at a point of contention unlike any I’ve ever seen. That certainly made me feel a little hopeless about the direction of this country. Yet having the community I did, along with our ability to have productive political dialogues, made one of the most complicated political realities bearable.

The intensity of the work at St. Vincent de Paul can be daunting for people joining the workforce for the first time, then add in adjusting to a 8:00-4:30 schedule while trying to manage the emotions that come with seeing people who are experiencing levels of urban poverty we were not previously aware of. Despite all of the obvious challenges that a year of service brings, I don’t believe I speak alone in saying the benefits of a year of service, especially being in community, are invaluable.

After our midyear retreat for VVC, I had time to reflect on the progress that we’ve made as a community. Last time we were all on retreat, we were playing Uno and asking awkward questions about each other. Now we’re taking personality tests and saying how each of us fit our personality types. “Oh Fare, you’re such a 9!”

The important question is, how did we get here? I look at our progress as a result of vulnerability, intentional conversations, and challenge. Community hasn’t been easy; there were certainly moments that really frustrated me. I willingly take those frustrations with the joy community has brought me. The next five months are what get me excited. I can’t wait to see how we grow in the next months because, as of now, I don’t know where I’d be without community.

 

Rene Betance spent his first few years in Chihuahua, Mexico, before bouncing around Texas and Ohio. The Xavier grad has a knack for conversation, will tell it like it is, and has never been sarcastic in his life.

The Importance of Retreat

Retreat. /rəˈtrēt/ (n.) an act of moving back or withdrawing.

By Sarah Spech

Retreat. /rəˈtrēt/ (n.) an act of moving back or withdrawing.

As part of our year with VVC, we are able to go on a mid-year retreat. Three days, almost exactly halfway through the program, with no work, (minimal) outside stress, and lots of community bonding. In the two weeks leading up to the retreat, there were many remarks of “I’m so ready for retreat” and the like from all of us.

Personally, it was needed even more as a renewal of enthusiasm for the work I do than anything else. While I thoroughly love the work I do, after so many months, it has become more of a “job” to get done than an act of service with a mission. Entering the retreat, I wanted to renew and refresh that sense of mission and the energy that I had. It’s so easy to grow away from the relational aspect of service and settle into the impersonal, transactional mentality of day-to-day tasks.

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Warm weather, nature, time with community, and time to focus on the reason for the work we do were the necessary medicine.

 

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(And fuzzy cows)

 

It makes me think about how in other years of my life, there was never the same time set aside for true retreat. While vacations can be relaxing, intentional time to reset and refocus while on retreat is rarely given priority (if ever). I have learned the necessity of leaving room for retreat in my future career. Even if that means vacation motivated and filled with my own intentionality to examine my life and goals.

It gives you a chance to refill your own cup. We were able to put intentional time into our individual and communal relationships, think deeply and critically about where we are in life and where we want to go, and center ourselves within ourselves in order to go out into the world, more solidly grounded within ourselves. And with a full cup, we are able to enter back into daily life, ready to give of ourselves to our neighbors in need.

 

Sarah Spech hails from Cleveland, Ohio, and graduated from the University of Dayton with an English degree. She enjoys music, talking about feminism, a hot cup of fair trade coffee, and dreaming about one day living beyond the borders of the Buckeye State.

Living the Year of Mercy Beyond 2016

Through VVC, I am able to live the Corporal Works of Mercy and my faith in an active, tangible way.

By Mary Ellen Ostrowski

As I look back on 2016, I am struck with how blessed I was to be able to spend part of the Extraordinary Year of Mercy in such a meaningful way, through becoming a VVC and working as a Patient Advocate at St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati.

Through VVC, I am able to live the Corporal Works of Mercy and my faith in an active, tangible way. I am able to comfort the sick through my role as a patient advocate, assisting neighbors in receiving life-saving medication. I cloth the naked, by giving thrift store clothing vouchers to neighbors who sometimes only had the clothes on their backs. I help feed the hungry and give drink to the thirsty by assisting in the Choice Food Pantry. I am able to (hopefully) be Christ to those that walked through the doors of our Outreach Center. I pray with people, listen to people, and give encouraging words to people. And even though looking back it seems like only a drop in the bucket, like it was a futile attempt to try and do something in a world so full of problems, I am reminded that even serving one soul makes it all worth it.

A quote attributed to Mother Teresa (a woman who exemplified living the works of mercy) sums it up perfectly, “I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the waters to create many ripples.” As I continue this VVC year of service in 2017, I am challenged to continue having an attitude of mercy with neighbors, with my community, and with myself.

But I encourage anyone reading this to also continue living a year of mercy every year. Do something. Do something big, small, short term, long term, helping one neighbor or a whole community, just do something. Have an encounter of mercy with your own neighbors. Remember that even seemingly small acts of kindness like sharing food or clothing can have an immense effect on those you serve and on your own life as well. Don’t let the immensity of the world’s problems cause you to be complacent or indifferent.

Don’t be afraid to make ripples! You never know what effect they will have on the world.

 

Grounded in her faith, Mary Ellen has an optimistic outlook on life. Through intentional decision making and dedication to personal prayer and reflection, Mary Ellen strives to grow as an individual on a daily basis.

Soul Food Feeds St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati

By Tim Barr

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As people, we share common needs for both physical and spiritual nourishment. Physical nourishment could be anything along the lines of eating, being active, or actually doing something. Spiritual nourishment would consist of self-reflection, prayer, and creating a space to allow God’s presence in.

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St. Vincent De Paul has been a common area where both of these needs have been met in one way or another, whether it be serving our many neighbors with food through our pantry or sitting down for a meal together as a staff. Praying with a neighbor is a staple of the organization and a strong foundation of hope through adverse times. We all share the common experience of our souls and the need for them to be nurtured.

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In February 2015, we hosted the inaugural Soul Food Session potluck, recognizing and celebrating Black History Month and the many souls that have helped and are continuing to help create it. We host the lunch in celebration of black history and to further perpetuate the love culture that exists in it and its home here at St. Vincent De Paul.

Soul food, in essence, comes from a place of love and nourishment for the soul. A lot of the recipes consist of everyday things that people would just have “around the house.” I use that term loosely because, for a lot of black families, it would be the very last of what they had or everything they could afford, which wasn’t much. The beauty in soul food is that it’s made from very basic ingredients, but made with enough love to feed families for generations.

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As we grow as an organization, it’s important to remember what’s at the core of our mission and the work we do: love. A recent study from the University of Chicago (Woolley & Fishbach) has proven that sharing meals or eating the same foods builds trust and cooperation within groups of people. The goal of the Soul Food Session potluck was to increase awareness and spark conversation about all the physical contributions of black culture to American history and the spiritual contributions to who we are as people.

 

Tim Barr is a former VVC and current volunteer coordinator at St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati. His succotash was a huge hit at the potluck, and his recipe was requested many times.